Monday, May 25, 2015

Monday Reviews - Lost and Found by Brooke Davis

Hello everyone!

I am back with another book review! I was sent a copy of Lost and Found by Brooke Davis to review by Penguin Canada. Thanks so much! Although I was sent a complimentary copy of the book, all opinions are my own.

As always, lets start with the synopsis!


Millie Bird, seven years old and ever hopeful, always wears red gumboots to match her curly hair. Her struggling mother, grieving the death of Millie’s father, leaves her in the big ladies’ underwear department of a local store and never returns.

Agatha Pantha, eighty-two, hasn't left her house—or spoken to another human being—since she was widowed seven years ago. She fills the silences by yelling at passersby, watching loud static on the TV, and maintaining a strict daily schedule.

Karl the Touch Typist, eighty-seven, once used his fingers to type out love notes on his wife’s skin. Now that she’s gone, he types his words out into the air as he speaks. Karl’s been committed to a nursing home, but in a moment of clarity and joy, he escapes. Now he’s on the lam.

Brought together in strange circumstances, the three will embark upon a road trip across Western Australia to find Millie’s mum. Along the way, Karl wants to find out how to be a man again, and Agatha just wants everything to go back to how it was. Together, they will discover that old age is not the same as death, that the young can be wise, and that letting yourself feel sad once in a while just might be the key to a happy life.


Well I have to say that this book was a pleasant surprise!

I wasn't too sure if I would enjoy this book, I've read similar books, whether it being dealing with seniors, being on the run, or just having an Australian spin. It reminded me a little bit of The 100-Year Old Man Who Climbed Out The Window and Disappeared by Jonas Jonasson, in the sense that it was a crazy adventure with old people, although it didn't have the painful historical references.

Anyways, I ended up really enjoying it! The writing was very lyrical and eloquent, I just kept turning the pages, I didn't want to take a break and stop reading. It was in third person but about the three characters lives.

Overall, I definitely liked it, I gave it a 4/5 stars, and would recommend it if you are looking for a little bit of a different story that discusses the meaning of life and the idea that we all die, so we might as well live life to the fullest.

Friday, May 22, 2015

Monday Reviews on a Friday! - Summer by Summer by Heather Burch

Hello everyone!

I am back with another Monday Reviews - on a Friday! This week, I am reviewing Summer by Summer by Heather Burch. Thanks so much to BookLook Bloggers for sending me this book for an honest review! All opinions are my own.

As usual, lets start with the synopsis!


When Summer took a job as a nanny for a couple vacationing in Belize, she imagined it would be a fresh start before starting college in the fall. And while she adores her charge, Josh, she can’t say the same for her employers’ oldest son, Bray. He’s cocky, inconsiderate, and makes her feel she’s a chore he has to put up with. In short, he’s everything she dislikes in a guy.

Bray had a plan for the summer: party, hang out with friends, and forget all the responsibilities waiting for him back home. But every time he’s forced to be around Summer, her dour, serious mood sets him off. Not to mention she has a habit of picking up on what he already knows is wrong with him.

Then the two find themselves on a dive trip gone wrong, stranded on a remote island. As they focus on survival, their differences melt away, and they find being together may be what both needed all along.
 




Overall, I really enjoyed this book! It was such an epic whirlwind of a story! The survival/stranded on a remote island in the tropics idea was very unique to what I usually read, so I found the entire story to be very refreshing! Everything that Summer and Bray went though was so intense and just insane to think about.

I loved the shipwrecked premise of this book, the only other survival type stories I have read that were similar were Lord of the Flies and These Broken Stars, and this book was still completely different from those, except for the survival aspect.

I liked Summer and Bray's relationship, and while I felt the whole Katie thing added a little bit of unnecessary drama, it still gave something to the intensity of the story!

While this is still technically considered a "Christian romance" it didn't seem overtly preachy or withdrawn. 
Overall, I really enjoyed this book, and gave it a 4/5 stars on Goodreads, because I enjoyed it but I didn't love every part of it!


Wednesday, May 20, 2015

Top 5 Wednesday - Debut Novels

Hello everyone!


I am back with another Top 5 Wednesday! If you want to check it out, you can go to the Goodreads group and read more about it.

This week's topic is top 5 debut novels! This was really hard to come up with, there are so many awesome debut novels, especially recently. 

5. Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher

I'm a little bit upset because I absolutely love this book but Jay Asher has only written this book and co-written another book, and I loved his writing style.

I would love to read more by Jay Asher, but I will settle for rereading his debut novel!








4. New World: Rising by Jennifer Wilson

This is a recent read for me, and I loved it! Jennifer Wilson did an amazing job of explaining a unique world and making a book that was 200 pages feel like it was really 400 pages (in a good way!) It was so beautifully written, I savoured every page!

I can't wait to read the sequel to this book and another books Jennifer Wilson writes!






3. Snow Like Ashes by Sara Raasch

Sara Raasch has some stiff competition in the fantasy monarch genre. Its in a category with the Throne of Glass series, and that in itself is a crazy feat! I felt like Sara Raasch did a great job of explaining everything and making the setting up a great fantasy trilogy! 

I can't wait for the sequel to this book and reading more of Sara Raasch's writing!



2. Slammed by Colleen Hoover

I have read and loved every one of Colleen Hoover's books. I read them in publication order, so I started my CoHo journey with slammed. I have to say that I definitely think that that is the way to read her books! They get better as time goes on, so starting with her debut is a good idea.

I will buy and read any and every book that Colleen Hoover writes!



1. Let's Get Lost by Adi Alsaid

This book is so amazing, in every aspect. The writing is so refreshing and beautiful. I will read anything Adi Alsaid writes!













So, there you have it! What are your top 5 debut novels?


Tuesday, May 19, 2015

TBR Tuesday - The Fearless by Emma Pass

Hello everyone!

I just wanted to quickly share my current read!



I received an e-ARC of The Fearless by Emma Pass via NetGalley, and I figured it was time to pick it up!

It sounds like a great dystopian, and I am really looking forward to it! The synopsis compares it to The Hunger Games, Matched, Divergent and The Fifth Wave, all of which are huge names in this genre, so I'm hoping it doesn't disappoint!

What are you currently reading?


Monday, May 18, 2015

Monday Reviews - New World: Rising

Hello everyone!

I am back with another Monday Reviews! This week, I am reviewing New World: Rising by Jennifer Wilson. I was lucky enough to receive a complimentary copy of the book from the author, however all thoughts and opinions are my own.

As always, let's start with the synopsis!

Since witnessing her parents' murders at the age of eleven, Phoenix's only purpose in life has been to uphold her mother's dying words- to be strong and survive. But surviving outside of The Walls- outside of The Sanctuary- is more like a drawn-out death sentence. A cruel and ruthless city, Tartarus is run by the Tribes whose motto is simple, "Join or die." Refusing to join and determined to live, Phoenix fights to survive in this savage world. Trusting no one, she lives as a rogue, fending only for herself. Then in a moment of rash judgment, she breaks all of her rules to save a child, and in that moment her life is turned upside down. When the rescue mission goes awry, Phoenix is captured by an underground group who claims no allegiance with either the Tribes nor The Sanctuary. She finds herself in the most dangerous game of survival she has ever played. In her captivity, only one person- the handsome and oddly sympathetic Triven- shows Phoenix something she has never before experienced: kindness. While warring with unfamiliar emotions and still skeptical of her captors' motives, Phoenix quickly realizes that these people may just hold the key to her lost memories. But who can she trust, when no one can be trusted? Not even herself.

This is a short book, but it didn't feel short when I was reading it! And not in a bad way, like it dragged on, in a way where each page was so well written, I thought I was reading 5 pages of your average author.

The concept of this novel is very interesting and unique, it reminded me a little bit of The Walled City, if that was a dystopian world instead of modern day. Phoenix is constantly hiding from the different tribes, whose personalities range from intelligent, clever assassins to caveman-like killers.

I really liked how independent and fierce Phoenix was. I know that there are a lot of kick-butt heroines out there, but Phoenix felt so sure of herself, and didn't let her guard down at the first sight of a boy. She does have her moments though, she is not a cold character, just not overtly warm and fuzzy. I really enjoyed her relationship with Triven, it wasn't insta-love, I thought it was paced beautifully!

The ending is a bit of a cliffhanger, so I would just say to prepare yourself, I had no idea what to expect.

Overall, I would definitely recommend this book and this author if you are looking for something a little different! I can't wait for the next instalment to this trilogy! 


Friday, May 15, 2015

Monday Reviews on a Friday! - Proof of Forever by Lexa Hillyer

Hello everyone!

I am back with another Monday Reviews - on a Friday! Today, I am reviewing a book that is coming out June 2, 2015, Proof of Forever by Lexa Hillyer. I was lucky enough to receive an advanced readers copy of this book from HarperCollins Canada. All opinions are my own.

As always, let's start with the synopsis!


BEFORE: It was the perfect summer of first kisses, skinny-dipping, and bonfires by the lake. Joy, Tali, Luce, and Zoe knew their final summer at Camp Okahatchee would come to an end, but they swore they’d stay friends.

AFTER: Now, two years later, their bond has faded along with those memories.

THEN: That is, until the fateful flash of a photo booth camera transports the four of them back in time, to the summer they were fifteen—the summer everything changed.

NOW: The girls must recreate the past in order to return to the present. As they live through their second-chance summer, the mystery behind their lost friendship unravels, and a dark secret threatens to tear the girls apart all over again.

ALWAYS: Summers end. But this one will change them forever.
 





I really wanted to love this book! I did, so that makes this a hard book to review. It was good, but it felt a little young, especially when the girls "went back in time" to when they were 15. I kept feeling like they were 12 years old, not 15.

I also had a hard time keeping each character straight. The story was told in 3rd person, but there are four girls and while they are somewhat different personality wise, the writing style made it a little hard to distinguish who was who.

I did like the idea behind the story though, they are sent back in time to try and fix their friendship, but ultimately, I didn't really care about any of the characters and the story just seemed to drag on. 

Overall, good just not great. I gave it 3/5 stars on Goodreads.


Wednesday, May 13, 2015

Top 5 Wednesday - Summer Covers


Hello everyone!

I am back with another Top 5 Wednesday! If you want to check it out, you can go to the Goodreads group and read more about it.

This week's topic is top 5 covers that remind me of summer! I am excited about this one because although I am in school for another month, I am definitely feeling the joys of summer!


5. My Life Next Door by Huntley Fitzpatrick

This cover is just bright and sunny and the couple makes think about summer romances. Plus, this is a great read!

















4. The Cost of All Things by Maggie Lehrman

The sun is setting, there's water and a dock, its summery and pretty!










3. Golden by Jessi Kirby

Again, sunny and just reminds me of summer!












2. Since You've Been Gone by Morgan Matson

Its sunny, they're eating ice cream, what else is there to say?











1. Even in Paradise by Chelsea Philpot

Finally, this cover screams summer! Sun, sand, light clothes, it just looks so fun and summery!




















Well, that was fun! Are you feeling the joys of summer yet? I know I am!


Tuesday, May 12, 2015

TBR Tuesday - Lost and Found by Brooke Davis

Hello everyone!

I am back with another TBR Tuesday! If you are new to TBR Tuesday, essentially I share the book I am currently reading, and the book I am planning on picking up next!



Right now, I am reading Lost and Found by Brooke Davis. I received it from Penguin Canada for review, and I am about 100 pages in. I wasn't sure if I would like it, I have read similar books in the past, but so far I am really liking it! The writing is so enchanting, I don't want to stop reading it!

I will probably be done it sometime tonight.

Once I finish Lost and Found I think I will either start Love in Rewind by Tali Alexander or Proof of Forever by Lexa Hillyer.

What are you reading today? What are you planning on picking up next?


Monday, May 11, 2015

Monday Reviews - The Cost of All Things by Maggie Lehrman

Hello everyone!

I am back with another Monday Reviews! This week I am reviewing a book that comes out tomorrow, The Cost of All Things by Maggie Lehrman. I received an Advanced Readers Copy of this book from HarperCollins Canada/HCC Frenzy in exchange for an honest review. All opinions are my own.

As always, let's start with the synopsis:



What would you pay to cure your heartbreak? Banish your sadness? Transform your looks? The right spell can fix anything…. When Ari's boyfriend Win dies, she gets a spell to erase all memory of him. But spells come at a cost, and this one sets off a chain of events that reveal the hidden—and sometimes dangerous—connections between Ari, her friends, and the boyfriend she can no longer remember.

Told from four different points of view, this original and affecting novel weaves past and present in a suspenseful narrative that unveils the truth behind a terrible tragedy.
 













Ok, so this book. I liked it but I didn't love it. I was confused most of the time and frankly, I think it was trying too hard to live up to the "for fans of We Were Liars" statement. There was even a fire at the end, similar to WWL

The characters also felt a little flat to me. I didn't really get a feel for Ari and Win's relationship because Ari erased her memory right at the beginning, and she remembered nothing of their relationship. I also felt like the four POV were a little much. One of the characters, Kay was just whiney, I never really understood the problem with Markos and his "non-lobotomy." As for Win, he was ok most of the time, but his POV didn't really give too much info on the story.

I enjoyed the concept of the book, but I'm still confused on what a hekamist is and how all that stuff works. Are they like witches or something? And why was there such an emphasis on them being illegal, yet when things went wrong, they weren't reported. They were never really fully explained and I didn't really get it. Was it supposed to be magical realism? Maybe, but I didn't get it.

Overall, this whole book left me with a lot of unanswered questions and frankly, I'm not sure I would read it again. I feel bad saying that, but it is the truth.

I ended up only giving it a 3/5 star rating, which is actually, I think a little generous.


Friday, May 8, 2015

Monday Reviews (on a Friday!) - My Heart and Other Black Holes by Jasmine Warga

Hello everyone!

As Mental Health Week in Canada draws to a close, I decided to post a review for one of my newest favourite books that deals with mental health, specifically depression and suicide. The book I am reviewing is My Heart and Other Black Holes by Jasmine Warga.



Before I get into my review, I will just say that there is a major trigger warning with this book, if you are struggling with depression, or suicidal thoughts, I don't recommend you read this or similar books. The majority of this book is set in a very dark place, and won't help you.

Alright, so let's get to the review! As always, the synopsis:


Sixteen-year-old physics nerd Aysel is obsessed with plotting her own death. With a mother who can barely look at her without wincing, classmates who whisper behind her back, and a father whose violent crime rocked her small town, Aysel is ready to turn her potential energy into nothingness.

There's only one problem: she's not sure she has the courage to do it alone. But once she discovers a website with a section called Suicide Partners, Aysel's convinced she's found her solution--Roman, a teenage boy who's haunted by a family tragedy, is looking for a partner. Even though Aysel and Roman have nothing in common, they slowly start to fill in each other's broken lives. But as their suicide pact becomes more concrete, Aysel begins to question whether she really wants to go through with it. Ultimately, she must choose between wanting to die or trying to convince Roman to live so they can discover the potential of their energy together.
 




Before I even start my review, can we just take a minute to admire this gorgeous cover? You think it looks great online, but I guarantee it is 1000% more stunning in real life! The stitching is almost 3D, you can feel it on the cover!

Okay, now that we have gawked over the cover, lets get to the book itself! 

I absolutely loved this book! I feel like I say that about 95% of the books I read, but honestly it is so true in this case. 

The concept of the book is so dark and because of the topic, it was a little difficult to read, and hard to get through. The whole first half is mainly about Aysel and Roman planning their suicide. This isn't a very light and fluffy book, so you shouldn't expect it to be anything short of gritty and raw. But towards the end, when things began to change, that was really when my heart broke. I don't want to say to much because it would spoil it but it became a little more hopeful, but I was still so sad because I didn't know what was going to happen. The ending itself is a whirlwind but I really enjoyed it. 

Like all books about suicide and depression, I truly believe that the author needs to do two things; show the reader the despair those in the situation feel, and also show the reader that there is hope if they feel similarly. Its one thing to just talk about suicide and depression and be done with it, but you need to have the belief in hope for yourself and the future in order to counteract the bad. I think Jasmine Warga did that beautifully here. She gave the characters the hope they needed to persevere  I'm not going to say what happens in the end, but it was heart wrenching.

Overall, I loved this book, and I highly recommend it! I gave it a full 5/5 stars on Goodreads.


Wednesday, May 6, 2015

Top 5 Wednesday - Top 7 Books Dealing with Depression and Teen Suicide

Hello everyone!



I am here today with a Top 5 Wednesday that is a little different. I made my own topic up, and I picked a top 7 instead of 5!

I will just say that there is a trigger warning for all these books, I wouldn't read them if you are struggling with depression or suicidal thoughts.

If you are struggling with depression and/or thoughts of suicide, please check out the CMHA's website and get help. You are not alone and there are resources to help you.

7. This Song Will Save Your Life by Leila Sales

Making friends has never been Elise Dembowski’s strong suit. All throughout her life, she’s been the butt of every joke and the outsider in every conversation. When a final attempt at popularity fails, Elise nearly gives up. Then she stumbles upon a warehouse party where she meets Vicky, a girl in a band who accepts her; Char, a cute, yet mysterious disc jockey; Pippa, a carefree spirit from England; and most importantly, a love for DJing.

I really enjoyed this book, and I feel like the depression that Elise feels is very real. I really loved how she was able to connect to music to help her, because music is one of those things that people use to set their mood, whether that be a bad mood or a good mood. I also really liked that this book focused on the school aspect, because teens nowadays struggle with fitting in.


6. The Last Time We Say Goodbye by Cynthia Hand

The last time Lex was happy, it was before. When she had a family that was whole. A boyfriend she loved. Friends who didn't look at her like she might break down at any moment.

Now she's just the girl whose brother killed himself. And it feels like that's all she'll ever be.

As Lex starts to put her life back together, she tries to block out what happened the night Tyler died. But there's a secret she hasn't told anyone-a text Tyler sent, that could have changed everything.
This is an important book because it deals with survivors guilt and the affects suicide has on those around you. I really enjoyed this unique spin on a very serious topic.



5. It's Kind of a Funny Story by Ned Vizzini

Ambitious New York City teenager Craig Gilner is determined to succeed at life - which means getting into the right high school to get into the right job. But once Craig aces his way into Manhattan's Executive Pre-Professional High School, the pressure becomes unbearable. He stops eating and sleeping until, one night, he nearly kills himself.

Craig's suicidal episode gets him checked into a mental hospital, where his new neighbors include a transsexual sex addict, a girl who has scarred her own face with scissors, and the self-elected President Armelio. There, Craig is finally able to confront the sources of his anxiety.

This book deals with Craig's suicide attempt and his stay in a psychiatric ward. It also talks about depression in others, and offers a lighter insight to a very heavy topic.

4. When Reason Breaks by Cindy L. Rodriguez 

A Goth girl with an attitude problem, Elizabeth Davis must learn to control her anger before it destroys her. Emily Delgado appears to be a smart, sweet girl, with a normal life, but as depression clutches at her, she struggles to feel normal. Both girls are in Ms. Diaz’s English class, where they connect to the words of Emily Dickinson. Both are hovering on the edge of an emotional precipice. One of them will attempt suicide. And with Dickinson’s poetry as their guide, both girls must conquer their personal demons to ever be happy.

This book shows that there are choices in life. Both Elizabeth and Emily are struggling but one of them choses to live. Hope is a major theme to this book, showing that no matter what, you will always have people around you who love you and will cherish you.


3. All The Bright Places by Jennifer Niven

Theodore Finch is fascinated by death, and he constantly thinks of ways he might kill himself. But each time, something good, no matter how small, stops him. Violet Markey lives for the future, counting the days until graduation, when she can escape her Indiana town and her aching grief in the wake of her sister’s recent death.
 
When Finch and Violet meet on the ledge of the bell tower at school, it’s unclear who saves whom. And when they pair up on a project to discover the “natural wonders” of their state, both Finch and Violet make more important discoveries: It’s only with Violet that Finch can be himself—a weird, funny, live-out-loud guy who’s not such a freak after all. And it’s only with Finch that Violet can forget to count away the days and start living them.

I loved this book, I don't what else to say!

2. My Heart and Other Black Holes by Jasmine Warga

Sixteen-year-old physics nerd Aysel is obsessed with plotting her own death. With a mother who can barely look at her without wincing, classmates who whisper behind her back, and a father whose violent crime rocked her small town, Aysel is ready to turn her potential energy into nothingness.

There’s only one problem: she’s not sure she has the courage to do it alone. But once she discovers a website with a section called Suicide Partners, Aysel’s convinced she’s found her solution: a teen boy with the username FrozenRobot (aka Roman) who’s haunted by a family tragedy is looking for a partner. But as their suicide pact becomes more concrete, Aysel begins to question whether she really wants to go through with it. Ultimately, she must choose between wanting to die or trying to convince Roman to live so they can discover the potential of their energy together. 

1. Thirteen Reasons Why by Jay Asher

Clay Jensen returns home from school to find a mysterious box with his name on it lying on his porch. Inside he discovers thirteen cassette tapes recorded by Hannah Baker, his classmate and crush who committed suicide two weeks earlier.
On tape, Hannah explains that there are thirteen reasons why she decided to end her life. Clay is one of them. If he listens, he'll find out how he made the list.
This book has a unique layout, told from someone left in the wake of a classmates suicide and through cassette tapes. It shares the warning signs as well as the psychological effects of suicidal thoughts and depression.



So there you have it! Seven books dealing with depression and teen suicide.

Tuesday, May 5, 2015

TBR Tuesday - Books to Read that Deal with Mental Health

Hello everyone!



I hope you are enjoying your week so far! I am here today with a very special TBR Tuesday! This week, I wanted to talk about mental health and some really great YA books that deal with the serious issues of mental health and mental illnesses.

I have a few really great books to share with you that I think would be an awesome addition to your TBR!

Both of Me by Jonathan Friesen (Dissociative Identity Disorder - DID)

It was supposed to be just another flight, until Clara found herself seated next to an alluring boy named Elias Phinn—a boy who seems to know secrets she has barely been able to admit to herself for years. When her carry-on bag is accidentally switched with Elias’s identical pack, Clara uses the luggage tag to track down her things. At that address she discovers there is not one Elias Phinn, but two: the odd, paranoid, artistic, and often angry Elias she met on the plane, who lives in an imaginary world of his own making called Salem; and the kind, sweet, and soon irresistible Elias who greets her at the door, and who has no recollection of ever meeting Clara at all. As she learns of Elias’s dissociative identity disorder, and finds herself quickly entangled in both of Elias’s lives, Clara makes a decision that could change all of them forever. 

I really enjoyed this book, I found it very interesting. I had never read any books that dealt with DID and found this book very insightful into the disorder. Dissociative identity disorder is often caused by severe psychological trauma. For more info, check out the Canadian Mental Health Association's page on DID.



We Were Liars by E. Lockhart (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder - PTSD)

A beautiful and distinguished family.
A private island.
A brilliant, damaged girl; a passionate, political boy.
A group of four friends—the Liars—whose friendship turns destructive.
A revolution. An accident. A secret.
Lies upon lies.
True love.
The truth.

Read it.
And if anyone asks you how it ends, just LIE.


I read this book last summer and despite the mixed reviews, I loved it! It is a wonderful contemporary that deals with post traumatic stress. I can't say too much about the PTSD because it spoils it, but just know that it is a great book that takes you on a crazy ride. For more info on PTSD, check out the Canadian Mental Health Association's page.



Say What You Will by Cammie McGovern (Obssesive-Compulsive Disorder - OCD)

Born with cerebral palsy, Amy can't walk without a walker, talk without a voice box, or even fully control her facial expressions. Plagued by obsessive-compulsive disorder, Matthew is consumed with repeated thoughts, neurotic rituals, and crippling fear. Both in desperate need of someone to help them reach out to the world, Amy and Matthew are more alike than either ever realized.

When Amy decides to hire student aides to help her in her senior year at Coral Hills High School, these two teens are thrust into each other's lives. As they begin to spend time with each other, what started as a blossoming friendship eventually grows into something neither expected.


While I didn't really enjoy this book, I thought it was a very honest depiction of OCD and the blend of physical and mental illness was wonderful. Amy tried to 'fix' Matthew's OCD because his condition was 'fixable', unlike her CP. I feel like a lot of times, people don't fully understand the extent of the illness, especially mental illnesses, and think that they are easily fixable or 'curable.' This couldn't be further from the truth, and I'm glad that this issue was touched on in this book. For more info on obsessive-compulsive disorder, check out the Canadian Mental Health Association's page.



My Heart and Other Black Holes by Jasmine Warga (Suicide and Depression)

Sixteen-year-old physics nerd Aysel is obsessed with plotting her own death. With a mother who can barely look at her without wincing, classmates who whisper behind her back, and a father whose violent crime rocked her small town, Aysel is ready to turn her potential energy into nothingness.

There's only one problem: she's not sure she has the courage to do it alone. But once she discovers a website with a section called Suicide Partners, Aysel's convinced she's found her solution--Roman, a teenage boy who's haunted by a family tragedy, is looking for a partner. Even though Aysel and Roman have nothing in common, they slowly start to fill in each other's broken lives. But as their suicide pact becomes more concrete, Aysel begins to question whether she really wants to go through with it. Ultimately, she must choose between wanting to die or trying to convince Roman to live so they can discover the potential of their energy together.


There are many books in the YA genre that deal with depression and suicide. This was one of the most engrossing books, I have read in a while, so I thought I would talk about it. MHaOBH deals with the extremely serious issue of teen suicide. I will say that there is definitely a trigger-warning for those that might not be in the best place, so I would only pick this up if you think you can handle it. This book is very dark, however, I believe that it is one that everyone should read. It's one thing to have a book that deals with suicide, but the main thing is hope. If a book can become hopeful even in the dark times, it is a great example of a book that deals with suicide. For more info on suicide and depression, please go check out the Canadian Mental Health Association's page.

I hope you decide to pick up some of these books, and I urge you to check out the Canadian Mental Health Association pages I've linked to get more information on each of the mental illnesses.


Monday, May 4, 2015

Monday Review - I'll Meet You There by Heather Demetrios

Hello everyone!

I am back with another Monday Reviews! This week, I am reviewing I'll Meet You There by Heather Demetrios.

As always, the synopsis;


If seventeen-year-old Skylar Evans were a typical Creek View girl, her future would involve a double-wide trailer, a baby on her hip, and the graveyard shift at Taco Bell. But after graduation, the only thing standing between straightedge Skylar and art school are three minimum-wage months of summer. Skylar can taste the freedom—that is, until her mother loses her job and everything starts coming apart. Torn between her dreams and the people she loves, Skylar realizes everything she’s ever worked for is on the line.

Nineteen-year-old Josh Mitchell had a different ticket out of Creek View: the Marines. But after his leg is blown off in Afghanistan, he returns home, a shell of the cocksure boy he used to be. What brings Skylar and Josh together is working at the Paradise—a quirky motel off California’s dusty Highway 99. Despite their differences, their shared isolation turns into an unexpected friendship and soon, something deeper.





I really enjoyed this novel. It was such a gripping and heartbreaking story. The two characters are broken for very different reasons, Skylar, who lives with her mom in a sleepy, trailer park town after her father's tragic drunk driving accident, and Josh, who's choices were to stick around town or enlist. And after losing his leg in Afghanistan, he is forced to return to the town he so desperately wanted to escape, struggling with his PTSD.

I found that the characters had a very realistic love story. There wasn't any insta love, it was more of a slow burning love that builds. There were bumps in the road, and issues with each character, but they were able to push through.

This was my first book my Heather Demetrios, and I really enjoyed the writing style and how everything was laid out. I will definitely be reading more of her books in the future.

Overall, I loved this book, and gave it a 5/5 stars on Goodreads and highly recommend!



This week is Mental Health Week in Canada! I will be spending the week showcasing books that deal with mental illnesses and help promote mental health awareness. 

I'll Meet You There by Heather Demetrios deals with post-tramatic stress disorder or PTSD. Josh comes back from fighting in Afghanistan and is diagnosed with PTSD. This illness involves exposure to trauma dealing with dealth, threat of death, or serious injury. For more info on PTSD, check out the Canadian Mental Health Association's website.